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Depas Exercise Lack Of Side Effects

Depas Exercise Lack Of Side Effect Reports


The following Depas Exercise Lack Of side effect reports were submitted by healthcare professionals and consumers.

This information will help you understand how side effects, such as Exercise Lack Of, can occur, and what you can do about them.

A side effect could appear soon after you start Depas or it might take time to develop.



Blood Creatine Phosphokinase Increased, Blood Urine Present, Congenital Central Nervous System Anomaly, Decreased Activity, Exercise Lack Of, Feeding Disorder, Hypercreatininaemia

This Exercise Lack Of side effect was reported by a health professional from JAPAN. A patient (weight:NA) experienced the following symptoms/conditions: NA. The patient was prescribed Depas (dosage: NA), which was started on NS. Concurrently used drugs:
  • Alprazolam
  • Ludiomil
When starting to take Depas the consumer reported the following symptoms:
  • Blood Creatine Phosphokinase Increased
  • Blood Urine Present
  • Congenital Central Nervous System Anomaly
  • Decreased Activity
  • Exercise Lack Of
  • Feeding Disorder
  • Hypercreatininaemia
The patient was hospitalized. These side effects may potentially be related to Depas.
Blood Creatine Phosphokinase Increased, Blood Urine Present, Congenital Central Nervous System Anomaly, Decreased Activity, Exercise Lack Of, Feeding Disorder, Hypercreatininaemia

This Exercise Lack Of Depas side effect was reported by a consumer or non-health professional from JAPAN on Sep 19, 2007. A male , weighting 8.38 lb, was treated with Depas. The patient presented the following health conditions:
  • Blood Creatine Phosphokinase Increased
  • Blood Urine Present
  • Congenital Central Nervous System Anomaly
  • Decreased Activity
  • Exercise Lack Of
  • Feeding Disorder
  • Hypercreatininaemia
. Depas dosage: NA. Additional drugs used at the same time:
  • Alprazolam
  • Ludiomil
The patient was hospitalized.
Blood Creatine Phosphokinase Increased, Blood Urine Present, Congenital Central Nervous System Anomaly, Decreased Activity, Exercise Lack Of, Feeding Disorder, Hypercreatininaemia

This is a Depas side effect report of a patient (weight:NA) from JAPAN, suffering from the following symptoms/conditions: NA, who was treated with Depas (dosage:NA, start time: NS), combined with:
  • Solanax
  • Ludiomil
, and developed a serious reaction and a Exercise Lack Of side effect. The patient presented with:
  • Blood Creatine Phosphokinase Increased
  • Blood Urine Present
  • Congenital Central Nervous System Anomaly
  • Decreased Activity
  • Exercise Lack Of
  • Feeding Disorder
  • Hypercreatininaemia
which developed after the beginning of treatment. The patient was hospitalized. This side effect report can indicate a possible existence of increased vulnerability to Depas treatment in patients suffering from NA, resulting in Exercise Lack Of.


DISCLAIMER: ALL DATA PROVIDED AS-IS, refer to terms of use for additional information.

Depas Exercise Lack Of Causes and Reviews


About 1 in 3 adults in the U.S. has high blood pressure, or hypertension, but many don't realize it. High blood pressure usually has no warning signs, yet it can lead to life-threatening conditions like heart attack or stroke. The good news is that you can often prevent or treat high blood pressure. Early diagnosis and simple, healthy changes can keep high blood pressure from seriously damaging your health.

What is blood pressure?

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure.

Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number.

How do I know if my blood pressure is high?

High blood pressure usually has no symptoms. So the only way to find out if you have high blood pressure is to get regular blood pressure checks from your health care provider. Your provider will use a gauge, a stethoscope or electronic sensor, and a blood pressure cuff. For most adults, blood pressure readings will be in one of four categories:

Normal blood pressure means

  • Your systolic pressure is less than 120 AND
  • Your diastolic pressure is less than 80

Prehypertension means

  • Your systolic pressure is between 120-139 OR
  • Your diastolic pressure is between 80-89

Stage 1 high blood pressure means

  • Your systolic pressure is between 140-159 OR
  • Your diastolic pressure is between 90-99

Stage 2 high blood pressure means

  • Your systolic pressure is 160 or higher OR
  • Your diastolic pressure is 100 or higher

For children and teens, the health care provider compares the blood pressure reading to what is normal for other kids who are the same age, height, and gender.

People with diabetes or chronic kidney disease should keep their blood pressure below 130/80.

Why do I need to worry about prehypertension and high blood pressure?

Prehypertension means you're likely to end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it.

When your blood pressure stays high over time, it causes the heart to pump harder and work overtime, possibly leading to serious health problems such as heart attack, stroke, heart failure, and kidney failure.

What are the different types of high blood pressure?

There are two main types of high blood pressure: primary and secondary high blood pressure.

  • Primary, or essential, high blood pressure is the most common type of high blood pressure. For most people who get this kind of blood pressure, it develops over time as you get older.
  • Secondary high blood pressure is caused by another medical condition or use of certain medicines. It usually gets better after you treat the cause or stop taking the medicines that are causing it.
Who is at risk for high blood pressure?

Anyone can develop high blood pressure, but there are certain factors that can increase your risk:

  • Age - Blood pressure tends to rise with age
  • Race/Ethnicity - High blood pressure is more common in African American adults
  • Weight - People who are overweight or have obesity are more likely to develop prehypertension or high blood pressure
  • Gender - Before age 55, men are more likely than women to develop high blood pressure. After age 55, women are more likely than men to develop it.
  • Lifestyle - Certain lifestyle habits can raise your risk for high blood pressure, such as eating too much sodium or not enough potassium, lack of exercise, drinking too much alcohol, and smoking.
  • Family history - A family history of high blood pressure raises the risk of developing prehypertension or high blood pressure
How can I prevent high blood pressure?

You can help prevent high blood pressure by having a healthy lifestyle. This means

  • Eating a healthy diet. To help manage your blood pressure, you should limit the amount of sodium (salt) that you eat, and increase the amount of potassium in your diet. It is also important to eat foods that are lower in fat, as well as plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. The DASH diet is an example of an eating plan that can help you to lower your blood pressure.
  • Getting regular exercise. Exercise can help you maintain a healthy weight and lower your blood pressure. You should try to get moderate-intensity aerobic exercise at least 2 and a half hours per week, or vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise for 1 hour and 15 minutes per week. Aerobic exercise, such as brisk walking, is any exercise in which your heart beats harder and you use more oxygen than usual.
  • Being at a healthy weight. Being overweight or having obesity increases your risk for high blood pressure. Maintaining a healthy weight can help you control high blood pressure and reduce your risk for other health problems.
  • Limiting alcohol. Drinking too much alcohol can raise your blood pressure. It also adds extra calories, which may cause weight gain. Men should have no more than two drinks per day, and women only one.
  • Not smoking. Cigarette smoking raises your blood pressure and puts you at higher risk for heart attack and stroke. If you do not smoke, do not start. If you do smoke, talk to your health care provider for help in finding the best way for you to quit.
  • Managing stress. Learning how to relax and manage stress can improve your emotional and physical health and lower high blood pressure. Stress management techniques include exercising, listening to music, focusing on something calm or peaceful, and meditating.

If you already have high blood pressure, it is important to prevent it from getting worse or causing complications. You should get regular medical care and follow your prescribed treatment plan. Your plan will include healthy lifestyle habit recommendations and possibly medicines.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


Depas Exercise Lack Of Reviews

Thu, 07 Feb 2013

Depas plus seroquel disturbed my metabolism.  I experienced rapid weight gain that is localized in the lower abdomen.  The flesh is hard not flabby.  It feels like a fluid weight gain.  My MD did blood work.  All parameters including liver enzymes were within normal range.  I have long since discontinued both medications.  The condition persists.  I am on a low salt diet even though serum sodium was within normal limits.

Sat, 17 Dec 2011

I have just stated taking hebessar since yesterday total 5 tablets and now I started having rashes all over my body and it is itchy. I have just taken one tablet of loratidine (anti-histamine)

DISCLAIMER: ALL DATA PROVIDED AS-IS, refer to terms of use for additional information.

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Top Depas Side Effects

Aspartate Aminotransferase Increased (10)
Somnolence (9)
Liver Disorder (8)
Blood Creatine Phosphokinase Increased (8)
Death (8)
Dizziness (7)
Altered State Of Consciousness (7)
Loss Of Consciousness (7)
Diarrhoea (7)
Fall (6)
Alanine Aminotransferase Increased (6)
Rash (5)
Vomiting (5)
Rhabdomyolysis (5)
Blood Lactate Dehydrogenase Increased (5)
Blood Creatinine Increased (5)
Overdose (5)
Nausea (5)
White Blood Cell Count Decreased (4)
Hepatitis Acute (4)
Insomnia (4)
Cardiac Failure Congestive (4)
Oedema Peripheral (4)
Dehydration (4)
Feeding Disorder (4)
Gamma-glutamyltransferase Increased (4)
Depressed Level Of Consciousness (4)
Hypercreatininaemia (3)
Exercise Lack Of (3)
Interstitial Lung Disease (3)
Epistaxis (3)
Restlessness (3)
Blood Calcium Decreased (3)
Blood Potassium Increased (3)
Malaise (3)
Decreased Appetite (3)
Decreased Activity (3)
Cerebral Infarction (3)
Congenital Central Nervous System Anomaly (3)
Blood Urea Increased (3)
Blood Urine Present (3)
Blood Pressure Decreased (3)
Neutrophil Count Decreased (3)
Palmar-plantar Erythrodysaesthesia Syndrome (3)
Neutropenia (3)
Hallucination, Visual (2)
Dermatitis Acneiform (2)
Tremor (2)
Visual Acuity Reduced (2)
Condition Aggravated (2)

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