sponsored
PatientsVille.com Logo

PatientsVille

Ebetrexat Device Dislocation Side Effects

Ebetrexat Device Dislocation Side Effect Reports


The following Ebetrexat Device Dislocation side effect reports were submitted by healthcare professionals and consumers.

This information will help you understand how side effects, such as Device Dislocation, can occur, and what you can do about them.

A side effect could appear soon after you start Ebetrexat or it might take time to develop.



Device Dislocation

This Device Dislocation side effect was reported by a health professional from AT. A 34-year-old female patient (weight:NA) experienced the following symptoms/conditions: psoriatic arthropathy. The patient was prescribed Ebetrexat (dosage: 20 Mg, Qw), which was started on 201202. Concurrently used drugs:
  • Humira
  • Folsan (5 Mg, Qw)
When starting to take Ebetrexat the consumer reported the following symptoms:
  • Device Dislocation
The patient was hospitalized. These side effects may potentially be related to Ebetrexat.

DISCLAIMER: ALL DATA PROVIDED AS-IS, refer to terms of use for additional information.

Ebetrexat Device Dislocation Causes and Reviews


What is a dislocated shoulder?

Your shoulder joint is made up of three bones: your collarbone, your shoulder blade, and your upper arm bone. The top of your upper arm bone is shaped like a ball. This ball fits into a cuplike socket in your shoulder blade. A shoulder dislocation is an injury that happens when the ball pops out of your socket. A dislocation may be partial, where the ball is only partially out of the socket. It can also be a full dislocation, where the ball is completely out of the socket.

What causes a dislocated shoulder?

Your shoulders are the most movable joints in your body. They are also the most commonly dislocated joints.

The most common causes of shoulder dislocations are

  • Sports injuries
  • Accidents, including traffic accidents
  • Falling on your shoulder or outstretched arm
  • Seizures and electric shocks, which can cause muscle contractions that pull the arm out of place
Who gets a dislocated shoulder?

A dislocated shoulder can happen to anyone, but they are more common in young men, who are more often involved in sports and other physical activities. Elderly people, especially women, are also at higher risk because they are more likely to fall.

What are the symptoms of a dislocated shoulder?

The symptoms of a dislocated shoulder include

  • Severe shoulder pain
  • Swelling and bruising of your shoulder or upper arm
  • Numbness and/or weakness in your arm, neck, hand, or fingers
  • Trouble moving your arm
  • Your arm seems to be out of place
  • Muscle spasms in your shoulder

If you are having these symptoms, get medical treatment right away.

How is a dislocated shoulder diagnosed?

To make a diagnosis, your health care provider will take a medical history and examine your shoulder. Your provider may also ask you to get an x-ray to confirm the diagnosis.

How is a dislocated shoulder treated?

The treatment for dislocated shoulder usually involves three steps:

  • The first step is a closed reduction, a procedure in which your health care provider puts the ball of your upper arm back into the socket. You may first get medicine to relieve the pain and relax your shoulder muscles. Once the joint is back in place, the severe pain should end.
  • The second step is wearing a sling or other device to keep your shoulder in place. You will wear it for a few days to several weeks.
  • The third step is rehabilitation, once the pain and swelling have improved. You will do exercises to improve your range of motion and strengthen your muscles.

You may need surgery if you injure the tissues or nerves around the shoulder or if you get repeated dislocations.

A dislocation can make your shoulder unstable. When that happens, it takes less force to dislocate it. This means that there is a higher risk of it happening again. Your health care provider may ask you to continue doing some exercises to prevent another dislocation.


Ebetrexat Device Dislocation Reviews

No reviews submitted yet, check in later.

Common Drugs

Abilify (10132)
Adderall (1304)
Amlodipine (6664)
Amoxicillin (4387)
Benadryl (1568)
Celebrex (12876 )
Celexa (1342)
Cialis (2975)
Cipro (8580)
Citalopram (7792)
Crestor (18839)
Cymbalta (14373)
Doxycycline (1757)
Effexor (7289)
Flexeril (435)
Flomax (2177)
Fluoxetine (4261)
Gabapentin (4593)
Hydrocodone (2469)
Ibuprofen (8222)
Lantus (10968)
Lexapro (3499)
Lipitor (17769)
Lisinopril (8919)
Lyrica (27148)
Medrol (650)
Mirena (41254)
Mobic (957)
Morphine (5356)
Naproxen (538)
Neurontin (6501)
Oxycodone (4438)
Pradaxa (13372)
Prednisone (5926)
Prilosec (2631)
Prozac (1954)
Seroquel (27216)
Simvastatin (8348)
Synthroid (4452)
Tamiflu (5585)
Topamax (3748)
Tramadol (5054)
Trazodone (1458)
Viagra (5394)
Vicodin (1153)
Wellbutrin (6324)
Xanax (2847)
Zocor (5718)
Zoloft(6792)
Zyrtec(1669)

Top Ebetrexat Side Effects

Multi-organ Failure (15)
Overdose (11)
Rash (8)
Death (4)
Acute Coronary Syndrome (4)
Thrombocytopenia (3)
Dyspnoea (3)
Alopecia (3)
Device Dislocation (2)
Sepsis (2)
Pancytopenia (2)
Leukopenia (2)
Lung Disorder (1)
Cardiac Failure (1)
Stent Placement (1)
Skin Lesion (1)
Small Intestine Carcinoma (1)
Circulatory Collapse (1)
Lung Infiltration (1)
Convulsion (1)
Pneumonia (1)
Injection Site Abscess (1)
Ulna Fracture (1)
Gastrooesophageal Reflux Disease (1)
Gastroenteritis (1)
Insomnia (1)
Fall (1)
Colitis (1)
Atrial Fibrillation (1)
Electrolyte Imbalance (1)
Erysipelas (1)
Pneumonitis (1)
Diverticulitis (1)
Angiogram (1)
Cough (1)
Accidental Overdose (1)
Pulmonary Function Test Decreased (1)
Pyrexia (1)
Mucosal Inflammation (1)
Myocardial Infarction (1)
Mouth Ulceration (1)
Metastases To Liver (1)
Radius Fracture (1)
C-reactive Protein Increased (1)
Pelvic Venous Thrombosis (1)

➢ More

Discuss Ebetrexat Side Effects