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Antifungal and Litican

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Antifungal Symptoms and Causes

Valley Fever is a disease caused by a fungus (or mold) called Coccidioides. The fungi live in the soil of dry areas like the southwestern U.S. You get it from inhaling the spores of the fungus. The infection cannot spread from person to person.

Anyone can get Valley Fever. But it's most common among older adults, especially those 60 and older. People who have recently moved to an area where it occurs are at highest risk for infection. Other people at higher risk include

  • Workers in jobs that expose them to soil dust. These include construction workers, agricultural workers, and military forces doing field training.
  • African Americans and Asians
  • Women in their third trimester of pregnancy
  • People with weak immune systems

Valley Fever is often mild, with no symptoms. If you have symptoms, they may include a flu-like illness, with fever, cough, headache, rash, and muscle aches. Most people get better within several weeks or months. A small number of people may develop a chronic lung or widespread infection.

Valley Fever is diagnosed by testing your blood, other body fluids, or tissues. Many people with the acute infection get better without treatment. In some cases, doctors may prescribe Antifungal drugs for acute infections. Severe infections require Antifungal drugs.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Litican clinical trials, surveys and public health registries


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Litican Side Effects

Septic Shock (3)
Hypertension (1)
Immunodeficiency (1)
Haemoptysis (1)
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (1)
White Blood Cell Count Decreased (1)
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (1)
Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion (1)
Mallory-weiss Syndrome (1)
Pneumonia (1)
Staphylococcal Infection (1)
Pain Of Skin (1)
Pain In Jaw (1)
Oxygen Saturation Decreased (1)
Oesophageal Haemorrhage (1)

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Antifungal Clinical Trials and Studies

Treatments might be new drugs or new combinations of drugs, new surgical procedures or devices, or new ways to use existing treatments. The goal of clinical trials is to determine if a new test or treatment works and is safe. Clinical trials can also look at other aspects of care, such as improving the quality of life for people with chronic illnesses. People participate in clinical trials for a variety of reasons. Healthy volunteers say they participate to help others and to contribute to moving science forward. Participants with an illness or disease also participate to help others, but also to possibly receive the newest treatment and to have the additional care and attention from the clinical trial staff.
Rank Status Study
1 Recruiting A Korean Study of Efficacy and Safety of Aprepitant-based Triple Regimen for the Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in the First Cycle of Moderately Emetogenic Chemotherapy (Non-doxorubicin Hydrochloride [Adriamycin] and Cyclophosphamide Regimens) (MK-0869-225 AM1) (KMEC)
Conditions: Nausea;   Vomiting
Interventions: Drug: Aprepitant;   Drug: Aprepitant Placebo;   Drug: Ondansetron;   Drug: Dexamethasone;   Drug: Ondansetron Placebo;   Drug: Rescue Therapy (granisetron, dolasetron, tropisetron or ondansetron; metoclopramide or alizapride).
Outcome Measures: The Proportion of Participants with Overall No Vomiting for the Overall Stage;   Number of Participants with a Complete Response - Overall, Acute, and Delayed;   Time to First Vomiting Event Overall;   Number of Participants with No Vomiting and No Significant Nausea;   Number of Participants with No Impact on Daily Life - Overall;   Number of Participants with No Use of a Rescue Therapy - Overall, Acute, and Delayed;   Number of Participants with One or More Clinical Adverse Events;   No Vomiting - Acute and Delayed
2 Recruiting Efficacy and Safety of Fosaprepitant Dimeglumine in Preventing Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting (MK-0517-031 AM4)
Condition: Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting
Interventions: Drug: Fosaprepitant dimeglumine;   Drug: Fosaprepitant Placebo;   Drug: Dexamethasone;   Drug: Ondansetron;   Drug: Dexamethasone Placebo;   Drug: Ondansetron Placebo;   Drug: Rescue Therapy
Outcome Measures: Number of participants with Complete Response from 25 to 120 hours after initiation of MEC.;   Number of participants with infusion-site thrombophlebitis;   Number of participants with severe infusion-site reactions, including site pain, or site redness (erythema) or site hardness (induration);   Number of participants with Complete Response from 0 to 120 hours after initiation of MEC;   Number of participants with Complete Response from 0 to 24 hours after initiation of MEC;   Number of participants with No Vomiting from 0 to 120 hours after initiation of MEC